Ep. 1 What is an influencer?

Episode Description
This week we dive into the topic of influencers. What they are and how gaming (and technology) helped to shape things. I’m joined by James aka Jimothy who handles EMEA Partnerships for PUBG.  If you’d like to be a guest on the show or have an idea for an episode head to influencerfundraising.com for more information.

The following transcript is done by Temi. Temi is an ai robot based transcription service.

[INTRO]
Alyssa:
Thanks for tuning in, I’m your host Alyssa Sweetman and you’re listening to Influencer Fundraising the Podcast. A podcast for the curious nonprofit professional who wants to take their digital fundraising strategy to the next level. Each episode I’ll bring on a guest to discuss a question as it relates to influencers and digital fundraising. 


For the purpose of this episode, I’d like to go over some terms you’ll hear me reference in this episode and in future episodes:

  • Content Creator – somebody who creates content with the intention of consumption. 
  • Streamer is a content creator who creates and streams live content, usually interactive.
  • Sometimes you might hear others refer to streamers as gamers. While this is true that a lot of streamers play video games that is not their sole role as a streamer. Nor do all the gamers in the world stream. We’ll have an episode on this in the future.
  • Sometimes you’ll hear references to a specific program on Twitch called the Partner Program where individuals who qualify are called Partners. Twitch describes the Partner Program as being for those who are committed to streaming and are ready to level up from Affiliate. You can learn more about it on Twitch.tv slash P slash Partners. 

This week we’ll be diving into the question “what is an influencer with our guest?”

Alyssa:
Hi, thanks for coming on the show this week, James.

James:
Yep. No problem at all. Happy to be here.

Alyssa:
Yeah. So we’ll be, we’ll be tackling the question today. What is an influencer with our guest, James, but before we do that, James, why don’t you tell everyone a little bit about yourself, your history and what you do now?

James:
My name is James. Um, I’ve worked in the games industry for roughly seven or eight years now. Uh, started out at a mobile company in Germany. Uh, I then worked at Ubisoft as a community manager for a couple of years, and now I work at PUBG as an influence manager.

Alyssa:
Very cool. Very cool. And, how are you doing today or this year?

James:
Okay. All things considered with the state of the year right now? Um, yeah. All right. I’d say all right.

Alyssa:
That’s all we can hope for with a year, like 2020. Yeah.

James:
I mean, I’m still alive. That’s a good thing.

Alyssa:
What, a bar to set!

James:
Yeah, exactly. I’m alive. It’s fine. Yeah.

Alyssa:
Well, thanks again for joining me to tackle a topic. What is an influencer? And I think this is really perfect. Um, so to get started, how would you describe what an influencer is to somebody who’s never heard the term before?

James:
So at influence, uh, is it’s pretty much just in the name. It’s pretty much in the title. Um, they are people with a large platform usually that can influence the decisions of others.

Alyssa:
It’s pretty simple,

James:
Pretty straightforward. Yeah. It’s uh, it’s, it’s, it’s one of those it’s, it’s, it’s just in the name.

Alyssa:
So simple. That it’s hard.

James:
Yeah, exactly.

Alyssa:
And in your role at PUBG, do y’all work with different sizes of influencers?

James:
I mean, like influence sort of has a scale, you know, like someone can have their own smaller community, but still be an influencer in their own. Right. You know, and we work with, we work with a bunch, like we work with a bunch of people from like low level, I’d say low level, even small people, um, to the larger sort of, you know, more mainstream, um, influencers, but they all have their own, you know, they all have their own platform. They all have their own communities that look up to them. So they’re all influencers in their own. Right.

Alyssa:
Yeah, absolutely. Um, and when working with these different sized communities, one of the questions asked is, are influencers that are micro sized or nano size, the smaller influencers, um, are they capable of moving the needle with their communities?

James:
Absolutely. Absolutely. I think that regardless of the size of someone there, they, as I say, they still have a bunch of people who look up to them. And so, you know, that they are part of that community and they respect what they have to say like that, as I say, influenced by what they have to say. Um, so I think regardless they can absolutely, um, they can absolutely have an effect.

Alyssa:
And what, what are some, I guess, learnings you’ve had working with influencers, like along the way, some things you wish you knew, some things that you never would have thought of.

James:
Um, one thing that I think is it’s something that I kind of, um, learned very early on. Um, and it’s something that I know a lot of companies don’t really understand, um, that the, although influencers do a lot of marketing work, you know, um, but at the end of the day, they are people running their own job. Um, they’re doing their own thing. They are all people with their own sort of, um, views, their own, uh, backgrounds. So I think it’s important to keep that in mind, um, when it, you know, whenever working with them. Um, yeah. And it’s, I’m trying to think of over the main learnings, to be honest with you, like, it’s been pretty, pretty good so far, to be honest, I, uh, I enjoy working with them, but that human element is a big thing because, you know, you can, you can pay an advertising agency, you can pay a marketing agency, you know, like, and that’s just, you know, that’ll just get done. Whereas with this kind of stuff, you really need to remember that these are people at the end of the day as well, you know, you, you’re working with them and you need to collaborate with them and talk to them.

Alyssa:
Yeah. So, um, what I’m hearing is there’s, there’s a big opportunity to lean into that authenticity and the fact that they’re human and not a faceless company.

James:
Absolutely. And I mean, I know a lot of, um, a lot of influences that I’ve worked with have of prided themselves on, you know, working on things and promoting things that they themselves, um, believe in, or, you know, even if it comes to a product it’s usually like a product that they enjoy or something that they enjoy, like, uh, in terms of the game stream is games that they enjoyed playing. Um, so I think, yeah, it has that real sort of authentic human element to it.

Alyssa:
Yeah, absolutely. So what’s some of the, if you, if you can recall any, some of the cooler activations you’ve seen influencers do either, either that you’ve worked on with yourself or just in general,

James:
Um, this is a difficult one. Let me, let me, let me think on this one.

Alyssa:
No worries. Um, I think some of the ones I like seeing are the, the edited Twitter posts people do, um, there’s a Twitch partner named friskk that does some really cool edited videos. I remember when she first got partnered with DXRacer, she made this video like that she was getting ready to go on a date with her chair.

James:
Yeah. I think the more creative ones in general, the more creative campaigns, whether that’s sort of, you know, from our side as companies or from the sort of mind of the influencers, themselves are always the most interesting ones because, you know, it’s, and it’s not a slight on and like anything, that’s just an advertisement, you know, like people have advertised or promotional streams and stuff and, you know, that’s grand like it’s completely fine. But I think that the creative ones are definitely like, I like to give people creative freedom, especially when I’m working with them. Um, because you know, these at the end of the day, a lot of these influences are creators and that’s kind of where they built a platform, whether you know, where they got their fans, where everything is as a career for them. Um, so that they’re the creative minds. So I like to give them, you know, maybe like a foundation, but give them like a real chance to be creative and do the, you know, do their own thing.

Alyssa:
Yeah. I think, I think that’s a big, a big thing. Not, not even just, um, nonprofits or charities that I work with. One of the bigger things I see, well specifically with nonprofits and charities is these, they get these creative agencies that don’t really know how to work with influencers. Um, they’re kind of more like celebrity talent, um, less authentic, authentic type programs. And then these nonprofits will hire them to do an influencer fundraising campaign with Twitch, streamers or YouTubers. And it won’t do very well. And what I find is that they just, they give so very specific instructions. It, it doesn’t matter who the influencer is.. it’s not going to work.

James:
I think when you do that, when you sort of, you know, really make things super specific and sort of, um, you, you, you, you cook creativity in that way. You know, like giving just a baseline of like, obviously, um, as a company, you, you know, you have something in mind that you have a goal in mind that you want to achieve with this campaign. Like whether that’s to, you know, advertise a new update, advertise product, you have something in mind. But I think giving this creative freedom, you get so much better results, like so much better results because at the end of the day, I feel like you could give anybody, um, a script and say, Hey, do that. And it’s, it doesn’t have that authenticity to it. It’s just like, you know, hi, I love the product. It’s great. You know, it wasn’t really a doesn’t have that human element. I think the human element is the big thing about influences as a whole. It’s the big surrounding bubble.

Alyssa:
Yeah. And I would, I would say that also it’s internet influencer, that idea, I think YouTube is probably where people started really getting a following. I remember in high school, my friends would show me these YouTubers with crazy amounts of followers. That would be the most annoying things. And they’d be like, I love this. And I’m like, why? They’re like, because it’s funny. And I’m like, Oh, okay. And I was like, this isn’t going to last well….here here we are.

James:
I feel like, um, I mean the, the space has grown so quickly. I remember the same thing. I remember being younger, you know, just at the start of the YouTube days when there was, I mean, even things like new grounds and stuff like that, you know, and people were starting to transfer all these flash animations and stuff over to YouTube. And the space was so much different than it is now, but still back then, you know, it was people with a platform like people follow these people and we’re like, you know, I like this guy’s videos. It’s whether that’s dancing baby or like, you know, some sort of music video.

Alyssa:
Yeah. Before. And I remember even before, um, YouTube, there was flash websites with edited content. Like there was joecartoon and illwillpress

James:
All the classics

Alyssa:
All of, all of these things that if they started today, probably, you know, with the technology to make them even better. And I know illwillpress still making content.

James:
Um, they’re, they’re all still a lot of people from that phase that sort of do keep going. Um, and I think it would be entirely different with the sort of social media driven, um, industry that we have right now. Like if they had started now with all these platforms and ways to sort of, you know, spreads the sort of, um, content I reckon, it’d be like insane. Some of these people would be on, you know, ridiculous follow numbers.

James:
Oh yeah. That’s a, that’s a good point. Because back then it was really, must’ve been really hard to get the word out

James:
I mean, I’m just, I’m just remember it from being younger myself, you know, it was very closed space. It was just, you knew someone at someone you knew at school or something would say, Hey, have you seen this? Or, you know, have you checked out this website? Oh, you you’d go on new grounds and see what was like the daily animation or something. And you go and check that out. I think it was all, it was all word of mouth pretty much. Like we didn’t have much contact with each other across the net.

Alyssa:
Yeah. And tabletop games started via email and in forums on the internet, but that’s a really cool one. Someone told me that the first multiplayer online games were all through email and I was like, what? They’re like, yeah. It would be a chain email, and people would just take turns and just forward it around.

James:
I just remember back in the day, like role and on forums, you know, and just you go to bed and like, Oh, it’s if they replied, if they someone done the next move yet, you know?

Alyssa:
Yeah. For me, I’m excited for NeoPets

James:
It’s coming to mobile Neopets.

Alyssa:
It is. But they do their website because their website is garbage.

James:
It’s super old. If I had, if I had had smartphones as a kid, especially with, uh, like Neopets on well that would, my time would have been gone, I would have been like sunk in that forever.

Alyssa:
Yeah. It was, it was crazy. And there is even, I remember there is even, um, rankings of people who played Neopets. So in a way there was kind of Neo pet influencers that you could reach out to and trade with.

James:
And again, I imagine, imagine if that was in the sort of space we had now, you know, like if it had launched, now there would be Neo pets channels, like dedicated channels with either information or entertaining content. Yeah. There would be like, like there is for Pokemon like this, you know, people who focus entirely on Pokemon,

Alyssa:
This is true. The internet is a crazy place. And technology is growing at an exponential rate. If you think about the time it took us to get from the industrial while pretty much everything after the industrial revolution has been ramping up very exponentially. But before that technology was really spaced out.

James:
It’s one of the things I always think about my childhood is that I grew up in a time where technology was just every single year. Pretty much. I felt like we had some sort of major advancement. I just, I mean, obviously I really, everything that games, consoles, like as I was growing up, I remember having the game boy with the sort of like, you know, having these a little torch to be able to see it at night. And then two years later it’s like, okay, here’s a cooler version of that. Like, Hmm. Okay. Yep. They had to wait. I remember the SP I’m getting the game boy advance SP back in the day.

Alyssa:
I think the last Game boy I got was game boy advanced. It was the pink one and had a backlight. It was super exciting. Played the heck out of some harvest moon.

James:
Good times…. Hiding it under the pillow. When my parents would come into my room and see if I’m awake.

Alyssa:
That’s funny. Did you ever have those… They were called scanners.

James:
I vaguely remember that. Are they the ones where you scan barcodes and you get like monsters out of them? Yeah, I remember that. .

Alyssa:
My, my, my aunt got me and my cousin now, but then she hated it because he’d always wanted to go to the grocery store. Right. We’re just scanning random things.

James:
To be honest, I don’t envy the kids now because I think everything’s just in like, you know, one place really like, everything’s so connected that you can have like a mobile or like a games console and you have everything, but there was so many of these, I think like, I mean, if you grew up in a similar, to me, it was all these attempts at making interactive stuff. And a lot of it revolved around just basic things like barcodes. And I remember I had a, I had a monster rancher game on the PlayStation one where you would put CDs into the PlayStation and it would generate a monster from like the CD.

Alyssa:
Okay. I had a PlayStation 1 but I have no idea what you’re talking about.

James:
It was super cool. I remember, um, cause my mother had like a big collection of CDs. Um, and I would just sit in front of the console, put one in a at a time. It would do like the whole loading screens, like okay. Put your CD in, you know? Okay. It’s scanning. I don’t know. I don’t know why, like each CD wasn’t even random. It was all, it was almost like assigned, it was super weird. Like certain CDs, you know, were guaranteed to have certain things on them. I remember using my mom’s CHER CD and it had like this amazing giant like rock golden thing. And I was just like, can I have this mom, can I have this CHER CD in case I need to use it again?

Alyssa:
That’s, that’s hilarious.

James:
I think innovations because things are still, you know, innovative nowadays. But I definitely think, um, if I think back then there was a lot more sort of attempts at trying new stuff. It’s probably super lame nowadays if they’re released it you know.

Alyssa:
Yeah. Yeah. I, I do think that like, it was kind of cool to grow up when they were still trying to get everything going out and now I look at some of the stuff and it’s cool, but it’s all super technology based. It’s like learn how to code as a kid. And it’s like, okay, but which one of these things is going to get them outside?

James:
I mean, and in a way it’s a, in a way it’s kind of, you know, it’s, I guess, I guess for this generation growing up with it though, it is just what they know just as it was with the same with us, you know, like it was just what we know. Um, I, I’m definitely, like, I definitely think that kids have a lot more opportunity to learn things, um, with the sort of power of the internet and the stuff that we have nowadays, you know? Cause I would, I would just read books. That like my dad had lying around or I would just hear stories from my mother and that’s how I was learned stuff, you know, outside of school.

Alyssa:
Yeah. Oh man, that makes me think of like kids today also have their own version of influencers. Like there’s YouTube kids.

James:
It’s one of the biggest turning people on YouTube, like a kid with a toy review channel.

Alyssa:
Yeah. He started it when he was like five and now he’s got a tv show

James:
I’m 28. I’ve got nothing where’s mine.

Alyssa:
I’m right there with you

James:
Yeah. I hate that kid.

Alyssa:
I’ve never been jealous of a five year old before but…. Yeah. And we also live in a, like a hypersensitive generation too, where I think our generation having kids now is trying to figure out how to make their kid famous and totally can understand, you know, the pluses to that. But also I’m like recently, um, my partner John is really big into the data hygiene and data democracy and protecting it. And as I’ve gotten older, I’m like, you know, as much as I would love to make a million dollars off my kid, I also don’t want everyone to know every little thing about them before they can talk.

James:
Yeah. For me, I mean, it’s like, it’s one of those things that I personally, um, I don’t feel it’s very like ethical, uh, in, in my eyes anyway. Um, just because I, I dunno, I think having a kid is a very, like, it’s a special thing. Right. And I don’t know, I wouldn’t feel comfortable. So I, I don’t, I don’t know. I feel like it’s the same way. It’s like a, you’re trying to live out your dreams for a child. Like, Hey, I could, I, I was never a big content creator, uh, his, uh, his Fortnite and I think it’s his YouTube like, go, go nuts.

Alyssa:
Yeah. Um, another influencer I saw, she talked with her kid, her daughter, she had been posting about her daughter, but I guess, um, a story she’d shared about her daughter and her Twitter, her daughter, wasn’t okay with it. And I thought it was really cool. One that she shared her story of her daughter letting her know, like I really would have preferred not to have that story shared on the internet. And her daughter I think is, you know, like 10 or 12. And so, you know, and this influencer shared that all posts now are cleared by her daughter if they reference her and things like that. And I think that’s a really cool way to one, you know, teach consent about posting things. Because I think since we grew up with it, this idea of, I remember you would take a photo when Facebook first came out and people would be like, don’t post it and then they’d be like, well, I’m going to post it anyways. So I think that’s a really cool thing.

James:
Totally agree. I totally agree. I think it’s, um, it’s also, it’s, it’s odd, but very interesting in a way that, um, to think back and think, you know, when I was growing up, um, all the sort of, you know, photos and all that stuff, my family just have them that physical, that just things that we have at home. Um, but there’ll be kids like in this generation that will reach a certain age. And you know, when they’ll start to learn about that, you know, the internet and how it works and stuff, and it’s like, Oh, that’s like my childhood pitches are all in this like, folder on like a computer, like all they’re all on the internet. Like, Hey, that’s, that’s me, you know, like,

Alyssa:
Yeah. And, and when you would bring home your school photos, you would mail one to all your relatives. Yeah. It’s, it’s interesting. I still enjoy getting photos printed, but they don’t, it’s not, it’s still just like those instant ones getting like high quality full of photos developed as a little bit harder.

James:
Yeah. And I think, I mean, I like the fact that nowadays, um, we can sort of take pictures and document things a lot easier. Um, I mean, you know, like when, when, when I was growing up, my parents had to take a proper, proper camera with them. If they wanted to take a photo or something and then get it developed. Whereas, you know, nowadays it’s like, Oh, Hey, here’s this cool thing. I take a high quality picture, bang. Yeah. It’s crazy. It’s like, I, it’s just, it’s so weird to me that we can like, especially my, I have like a very decent phone now. Um, I’ve been taking pictures with it, just, you know, just walking around or like pictures of food that I’ve cooked or whatever. And it just, it’s so odd to me that I can just click and I’m like, Hey, it looks pretty good. I can just press the button one time. Like I don’t need to edit that. Like that’s all right. It looks kinda good.

Alyssa:
I’m trying to picture like 30, 30 years ago, my parents being like, Oh, this this meal looks good go get the camera

James:
And then going to develop next week. Yeah.

Alyssa:
Yeah. It’s so, so funny. You wouldn’t think of wasting a photo of on something like that

James:
Yeah, exactly. It’s like, how many photos do we have left? Like we have, okay. We have 20 left in the role, make them count.

Alyssa:
Yeah. That’s, that’s so crazy. And I think, I think, you know, the documentation, the connectivity, the internet, the overall desire to connect. And I think one of the things I like about the internet is all technology, in my opinion, is it’s agnostic. It’s neither good nor bad. Just how people use it. What I love about the internet is that people may feel in their lives that there’s nobody, that they can connect to you on a one and an in person level, but they’re able to find, you know, other people like them on the internet. And I think that’s what makes influencers so powerful is that ability that human element

James:
Absolutely. I mean, um, I grew up with myself, um, you know, always sort of having the sort of less cool hobbies, uh, growing up, you know, you really like me and my friends are, there’s like a group of about three or four of us. And we spent every lunchtime, like in the library playing magic, the gathering, playing like, you know,Warhammer with our maths teacher as to what got, you know, like probably as lame as you can get. But then as soon as, uh, you know, and that started becoming more of a bigger thing, we started getting involved in sort of like online gaming communities. I remember trying to explain it to my parents when I was younger. It was like, you know, like, Oh, who are you talking to? Oh, this dude from Norway. He’s like, who’s that like, how are you doing that? Like,

Alyssa:
Yeah. Um, I will, I will say I definitely learned a lot about how I should have been guided being on the internet, you know, it’s new the idea of being able to do bad things wasn’t really on people’s minds. It was new and fancy,

James:
I think. So I think it’s, I mean, that’s always been one of those things. It’s like, um, it’s brilliant, but also, you know, there are a lot more sort of, uh, dangerous and stuff that we’ve opened ourselves up to for it.

Alyssa:
Yeah. It’s like, it’s like driving a car. No one actively thinks very much anymore about all the dangers that are involved and because you do it every day. And I think that’s the same thing with the internet. It’s so a part of our lives, we don’t think much about it.

James:
It’s all to think of a time. Um, when we didn’t have the internet, when it wasn’t just a core part of my life, you know, like even like a smartphone, like waking up in the morning just to check the news and, you know, see if I got any messages I don’t. Oh, I see. I’m trying to, I’m trying to stay away from my emails. Like when I’m, when I’m, when I’m not at work, I’m usually like, okay, you know, unless I’m waiting for a package, if I’m waiting for a package, I’m checking my emails every five minutes. Cause I was trying to see where, where it’s at.

Alyssa:
I don’t know what it is about email, but I just want it so badly to stay at zero. And every night I go to sleep, it’s, it’s a low number. And then every morning it’s like, I didn’t do anything

James:
I’m so bad for that. Uh, I leave my emails, um, and I don’t even Mark them as read. So, uh, yeah. My personal Gmail account right now is a 2,718. unread emails.

Alyssa:
It hurts.

James:
I mean, I could mark all as read

Alyssa:
Yeah. I think, uh, I just like to be really on top of things. And the one thing I liked about email is it’s so trackable. It’s all there. And so I tend to like steer pretty heavily to communicating via email. And I know like we’re reaching a generation where they’re like email that’s archaic.

James:
Exactly.

Alyssa:
It’s still the most effective internet form of communication because yeah.

James:
Yeah. That’s the thing it’s like, it’s having that paper trail. Right. It’s having that paper trail just yeah,

Alyssa:
No like, but Snapchat me. And I’m like, I’m gonna forget midway through our conversation, what we’re talking about on Snapchat and I’m not going to be able to read it. I don’t want your Snapchat.

James:
That’s like all these platforms. All right. I guess so I sound like such a boomer right now. There’s like, there’s all these, there’s so many platforms. It’s like, Oh yeah. Hey bro, get me on, get me on this. I’m like, yeah, but I use this. Yeah. But I use that. So, you know, if you want to talk to me. Yeah.

Alyssa:
That’s old we don’t use that anymore. It’s it’s came out in the last five years. What do you mean? Don’t use it anywhere also. Snapchat is just one of those things I just don’t get because it’s like you can send messages and photos through your messaging app on your phone.

James:
You know, it’s, it’s its own thing now. I mean, I I’m, I’m kinda, I’m kinda glad that the online gaming community is all embraced discord because it’s nice to have one platform. But when, um, when I was growing up and playing a lot of games online, it was always okay. What, what we connect into? Oh, we, we use TeamSpeak. Oh, we use mumble, you know, we use ventrillo and you got all these applications. Okay. For that group of friends. Which one was it again? Like

Alyssa:
When I got really into online gaming, it was late 20 end of 2014 and it was through a Facebook group and there is like a small number of people that we were always talking. And so we were like, we’re going to get TeamSpeak. And so one of the people in the group set up a team speak, but he would be at work and it, his server would update in the middle of what we were doing every time. So that’s when we started on the downloading, everything we can think of. And we tried them all until we landed on discord. So I’ve actually been on discord since shortly after they launched. And I couldn’t, it didn’t have hardly any features when we first downloaded it. I don’t even remember what features it had, if any, other than connect to voice and type in chat.

James:
I like that. I remember the text, the text to speech though.

Alyssa:
Uh, when that first came out and people started doing it, I hated it. I turned that off automatically and every single, every single Thing. And I totally get, it’s a free accessibility feature for anyone that might be, but too many trolls you’d be, you’d be streaming or doing something and forget it would be open. And all of a sudden, some random comment and you’d be like … where is that coming from?

James:
I remember that was like a, I don’t know if it was removed for those a part of discord right. Back in the day, I say back in the day as if… it’s still there. I remember I remember being on discord and then you just, you know, you would just hear some it’s like, wait, where’s that coming from? You checking all your tabs. So I do I have a video, open something like, Oh, I, Oh no, we don’t like, it’s just someone typing things.

Alyssa:
I think either it either got phased out of being the troll thing to do or it’s not on by default anymore.

James:
Yeah, I think it might just be off by default. Yeah. But it’s a communication platforms are changing. Yeah. We’ve been, we’ve been chatting about being old for a while.

Alyssa:
Uh, yeah. Uh, welcome to boomer one Oh one for millennials.

James:
Although I, all the zoomers man I there, I talked to like my younger cousin. So like how, how do you know that? Or like, why, you know, why, why are you downloading all these different apps and stuff? And like, ugh you just won’t get it your old. I am not all like, I am not old. I am young and sprightly and

Alyssa:
Knee high to a grasshopper, Okay. Yeah. Well, it’s, it’s a good thing to do zoomers. Aren’t the target demographic to this podcast…because they would have already turned it off.

James:
Very true. Because they’d be like like a minute in and you know, I haven’t said like lit or smash that subscribed yet. And so they’d be gone.

Alyssa:
You heard it folks. Don’t forget to subscribe.

James:
Smash that like.

Alyssa:
It’s yeah. It’s, it’s, it’s insane. Um, so James, thanks for, thanks for coming on today. It’s been a lot of fun.

Alyssa:
Um, and if you just had any last parting wisdom that you wanted to share with our audience, with working with, um, influencers.

James:
Yeah. I mean, so in terms of working with influences, I would absolutely reiterate what I said before. Um, and just remember that there is that human element, you know, like build connections with people, um, people aren’t tools, they’re not just, you know, advertisements. Um, these are actual people doing a job, and I think it’s super important to remember that and to work with them, um, like on that level to really connect with them. And I think getting into like, you mean getting slightly industry as a whole or like this kind of work.

Alyssa:
I would say that it’s more about, so nonprofits listening to this podcast are going to be thinking about how can I work with influencers? How can I work with gamers? How can I work with streamers? And so kind of demystifying what it means to work with those groups. And so when thinking of an influencer, thinking of just, um, that’s probably the most asked question is how do I work with influencers? How do I identify them? And I always just tell people if their emails are public just email them.

James:
I absolutely agree with that. I mean, just reach out to the, a lot of them, you know, a lot of influencers, a lot of content creators, um, have these email addresses or just ways to contact them, like in their Twitter bios, um, in their Instagram, you know, they, they, they usually have some form of contact, whether that’s for their management, for the larger ones or directly with the sort of smaller, more midtier ones, um, just reach out. I think it’s always just good to reach out. I mean, you know, like the worst that can happen is someone who’s just not interested, which is fine, completely fine. Um, and you’ll, you’ll find a lot of people are very, very interested just to speak to you about it. You know, people like to do like to do things for charity. They enjoy that. It’s, you know, people, especially in the, um, the streamer space, there’s a lot of good charity drives a lot of good things that go on on that space. Um, and people are very willing to, um, you just have to reach out to them, you know, just as I say, remember that these are people as well, and they just want to have a chat like that. They should be down for a chat.

Alyssa:
Yeah, absolutely. Everyone is extremely helpful and James, where can our audience, if they wanted to get in touch with you or PUBG what would be best.

James:
So you can find me on Twitter, um, uh, @JimothyTv, um, or you can find me on Twitch, twitch.tv/jimothyz I’m on Twitter. I have my DMS open as well. So if anyone actually does, you know, want to get in touch, um, has any additional questions, I’m more than happy to answer them.

Alyssa:
See, he doesn’t like email.

James:
I mean, well, I have so many unread emails that I usually just like, you know, pizza promotion.

Alyssa:
Yeah. Over, over 2000 unread emails.

James:
Yeah. It’ll take me a while to get for, you know, the Amazon orders, like the Domino’s pizza receipts. But yeah, if anyone, if anyone does have any additional questions, do you feel free to reach out to me I’m more than happy to, we’re happy to talk. Always happy to talk about like my job to talk about the industry, just to talk in general, you know, I’m lonely (joke).

Alyssa:
That is a note to end. Thank you again for coming on.

James:
Thank you very much for having me.

Alyssa:
While I hope this gave you some great insights I’ll be using Influencer Marketing Hub’s definition that you can refer to when you think of the word Influencer on this show.

An influencer is someone who has:

  • the power to affect the purchasing decisions (or in this case affect donations) of others because of their authority, knowledge, position, or relationship with their audience.
  • a following in a distinct niche, with whom they actively engage. The size of the following depends on the size of his/her topic of the niche. I will often refer to three main types: macro (or more commonly called mega) influencers, micro influencers and nano influencers.

It is important to note that these individuals are not merely marketing or fundraising tools, but rather
Individuals with a social presence who if they believe in you and your mission can wield their audience for good. 

Thanks for listening to this week’s episode and if you enjoy the show please consider sharing it with your friends and colleagues. You can find Influencer Fundraising the Podcast on Spotify, Overcast and many more. If you’d like to be a guest on the show or have an idea for an episode please head to www.influencerfundraising.com for more information. 

Thanks for listening and stay curious.