Ep 2. Are all streamers gamers?

Episode Description
streamers is that they are all gamers. This tends to lead to a very specific marketing strategy and the start of “othering” gamers and streamers. In this episode we are joined by Ichibadass long time content creator on YouTube and Twitch to discuss streamers and gamers. 

The following transcript is done by Temi. Temi is an ai robot based transcription service.

INTRO
Alyssa:
Thanks for tuning in, I’m your host Alyssa Sweetman and you’re listening to Influencer Fundraising the Podcast. A podcast for the curious nonprofit professional who wants to take their digital fundraising strategy to the next level. Each episode I’ll bring on a guest to discuss a question as it relates to influencers and digital fundraising.

Alyssa:
Hey Ichi. How are you doing today?

Ichibadass:
I am doing fantastic. Aly, thank you for having me on the podcast today.

Alyssa:
Thanks. Thanks for coming on to talk about it. Um, you know, let’s kind of just dive right in. Uh, tell me about yourself, tell our audience, your username, how it came about who you are, what you do.

Ichibadass:
So I’m Ichibadass. I’ve been streaming on the Twitch gaming platform for more than five years now. Uh, I’ve been actually a part of the platform for more than seven, just over seven years. I actually originally started with creating content on YouTube more than nine years ago with, uh, achievement videos.

Alyssa:
Achievement hunting?

Ichibadass:
Um actually doing tutorials on like how to get the achievements of basically, cause I was the achievement whore on the Xbox360.

Alyssa:
Gotcha. And for our audience listening, they probably don’t play video games or understand the achievement systems you might expanding on like what that is for our audience.

Ichibadass:
Um, so basically think of medals ribbon, ribbons trophies, which dates back hundreds of years. It’s amazing what the, uh, a human being would do for a, a piece of metal as Napoleon would say. Um, so those, those original pieces of content was actually just reverse engineering, uploaded content to YouTube that just, uh, optimized it. Whereas like the best example would be civilization. Revolution is actually the first game that I made achievement videos for. And the achievements is for typically fulfilling a specific task. And whether it’s something easy or something more difficult, I originally went looking for the, you know, basically help. Most people use YouTube as a form of, you know, for do it yourselves and everything like that. And the original uploaded content then was like these two hour long videos. Nobody’s got two hours to find the answer, right? If your toilet is clogged, you need to tell me to use a plunger, like straight up.

Ichibadass:
You can’t, you can’t tell me to like, you know, I got to go to Home Depot. It’s the, you know, it’s a third row. And then, you know, you take a left talk, the Joe and be like, nah, nah, that doesn’t work. So I reverse engineers those original videos did my own content on that and dropped it down to like, you know, 15, 30 minute videos instead of like two hours of bull crap, which back then the algorithm was based for, um, kind of anything goes on YouTube where you could have a viral two minute clip and be doing pretty good, which they’ve since then, like change the hell out of that.

Alyssa:
Yeah. I think the internet in general back then was a little bit of a wild West.

Ichibadass:
Yeah, I guess. I mean, it still is back then. We at least had vine, which is now TicTok today. The only difference between the two is a vine. If you sold somebody skit, people would get mad on TicToc. It’s actually promoted to like copy and pasta.

Alyssa:
Oh yeah. Also I’ve most people have not heard of Dubsmash, but Dubsmash came after Vine had died a couple of years later. But the interesting part about it was that Dubsmash is basically what TicToc is today. But TicToc has monetization and better discovery. There was no discovery mechanism with dub smash. It was, you would create them and share them. So it combined vines discovery tools and, um, added monetization that didn’t exist on vine and combined it with dubsmash.

Ichibadass:
Oh, that’s really neat. Actually. Never heard of Dubsmash.

Alyssa:

Yeah. Well a lot of people haven’t, but when Tecton came out, that was one of the things that I noticed is that it felt very much like a combination of two things. So that’s really cool. You started out on YouTube nine years ago. Wow.

Ichibadass:

Yeah.

Alyssa:
That’s that’s a long time. I personally have only been around the online gaming space since like April of 2015. So I’m really new to the space. And in that regard consumed a lot of content, just wasn’t really active. And now you’re, you’re streaming on Twitch. You’ve been doing that for, for uh, five years. Um, what kind of games do you stream how’d you? What were the first things that you streamed?

Ichibadass:
Unfortunately, the first thing I streamed was speed running Minecraft,

Alyssa:
How does one speed run a Minecraft?

Ichibadass:
I, uh I, everybody always asks that. So speed running in general. If you’re familiar with it is just starting the game in a like new state, unless you’re doing something else and finishing as fast as possible, which typically is, you know, the, the credit roll. So the speed run Minecraft is actually to get to the end and kill the end dragon because when you jumped on that end portal, it rolls the credits immediately after it is one of the worst speed runs you could possibly ever do at least back then on, um, five years ago when I started, because it’s so RNG heavy, getting the end pearls with Enderman, it’s just it’s it’s not a good speed run. It could take six minutes, like world record pace, or it can take you like two hours

Alyssa:
So you just restart the game to get better RNG each time. Or the hope is the RNG is better the next time.

Ichibadass:
Yeah. It’s, it’s very, very RNG heavy and not even in an entertaining way either.

Alyssa:
Um, and you speed round other you’ve speed ran other games.

Ichibadass:
Yeah. So I’m also a speed runner. I have speed ran a variety of different games, including all, not just including Minecraft, but Resident Evil 7 or Resident Evil 3 remake, the recent one that just came out. Cuphead, um, Undertale —-

Alyssa:
These all sound like what people would call try hard games.

Ichibadass:
Try hard games?

Alyssa:
You never heard that term?

Ichibadass:
Oh, I know. I know. Try hard. Yeah. Yeah.

Alyssa:
But, but these games all sound hard to me. Well, what you said, Cuphead, and then you said Undertale and those are two very try hard games for me personally. So….3

Ichibadass:
I wouldn’t, I wouldn’t, I mean, I guess you could say try hard, at least for the fact that like, uh, the routing for casuals would take like substantially longer than speed running it. Cause Cuphead, for example, a casual playthrough is like 16 hours long. I speed run it in sub 32 minutes. World record is 26. So for me to beat in 32 minutes versus somebody casually playing it in 16 hours is substantial. But you know, I played through the games blind first and you know, I take it casual, casual approach before I ever speed run anything because I don’t want to like ruin the experience, but I’ve also speed ran and routed. Uh, We Happy Few you originally when that was an alpha, uh, Five Nights at Freddy’s sister location. I speed ran that, routed. It had three world records. And on that, I have two at the moment, somebody beat one of my world records. Um, couple other things that I’ve speed ran, including doing like a sample runs of like Dark Souls or Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild on the Nintendo switch. Actually not on the switch WII U, it was actually better.

Alyssa:
Oh, interesting. I don’t think I know. Well, not many people would say Wii U is, is the console to play on, but I have heard other speed runners mention this.

Ichibadass:
well it’s because with legit has a little breath of the wild, um, when that was released, it was the transition of the Nintendo switch being first released. So it runs better on the, we, you it’s more optimized because it’s more familiar hardware for the developers, then the Nintendo switch at the given time. So in terms of like constant frame rates that Wii U ran better than the Nintendo Switch because they both the, Wii U runs at 720P uh, 30 FPS and the Nintendo switch in handheld mode runs at 720P, but then it upscales, it’s not upscaled. It actually, it runs at 900P um, well docked, for breath of the wild. And since you’re going to be speed running this docked versus like the, Wii U we use just, it’s always technically docked. Um, that’s a problem because you’re not going to be speed running it in handheld mode because you’re not going to be able to stream it in handheld mode. If you’re you’re running it, unless you’re like you’re taking a webcam to the screen and being all, I don’t know.

Alyssa:
I mean, I have seen people do that. These are people who maybe haven’t heard of a capture cards or things like that. And that was before there was the mod that came out for the 3DS handheld for speed running for that

Ichibadass:
Homebrew. Yeah. Well actually actually wait a minute. Oh, I don’t, I don’t know if you’re familiar with it. So the 3DS actually has both. You have it, home-brewed where it allows you to broadcast the gameplay over wifi or the physical modification that allows you to like hook it up to your computer and everything for game cap.

Alyssa:
I was definitely think I was referencing the physical modification. You had to send your 3DS off and hope it came back in one piece.

Ichibadass:
Yeah.

Alyssa:
That’s really exciting. You do a lot. And you know, you’ve been on Twitch for five years, so you’ve done. I’m assuming probably charity streams.

Ichibadass:
Yeah, I’ve done charity. What’s a charity Kappa. Uh, I’ve only recently started doing charity in the past three years. The first one was a spur of the moment after I got home from the gym fundraising for Hurricane Harvey relief.

Alyssa:
Would you say that that kind of is what got you into it that…

Ichibadass:
um, it got my feet wet in terms of like, uh, getting started, but didn’t exactly give me the tools or the information at the time to like, you know, optimize it. Speed runner speed, runner strats, whereas, Later fundraising with extra life for kids and even st. Jude I’ve done way more with, cause with extra life for kids I’ve currently raised just under like $5,000, uh, St. Jude raised, uh, just over like $8,200 going into this year.

Alyssa:
Very nice.

Ichibadass:
Yeah. Every dollar counts.

Alyssa:
Yeah. Um, that’s really awesome. And you know, that’s really what this podcast is about is just getting information to nonprofits. So that, and influencers, and I know streamers tend to balk at the word influencer, but —

Ichibadass:
I mean, like, if you look at the word influencer, right. Which is what most content creators are, regardless of platform that you’re looking at, there’s somebody who is an influence that, you know, can convince people to buy a game or an album or a piece of clothing, right?

Alyssa:
Yeah. They, they have influence over, um, dollar power for someone else.

Ichibadass:
I mean, for the perspective of like a charity organization, looking on taking on influencers, you’re looking for, you know, the, somebody who can rally others to a common goal and be a voice to, you know, get the word out there that preferably genuinely cares about the program in question and, fundraise for it. And not just somebody paid, you know, minimum wage to hold a sign outside of an establishment.

Alyssa:
Yeah, absolutely. And actually that’s really at the, kind of the core of what I wanted to bring you on and talk about today is, um, many nonprofits exploring this space. Because we all know the media will portray things in the easiest light possible, and they only things like Games Done Quick or, um, GCX, or even some larger influencers who have done streams. Um, the article is always gamers playing games for good, but I always felt like that was a little misleading because it’s not someone didn’t play a video game for good. Like they didn’t sit at their home. And like the video game is what did the money, it was the, the donate, the donating power. It was their influence on their community and their fans as an entertainer or a content creator or streamer or influencer. And so I just kind of wanted to talk about like, you know, you’re an avid gamer, but you’re also an influencer. And just introduce the nonprofits, listening to the show into the idea that gaming is, uh, is only one part of being an influencer and that if they can zoom out from that idea of gaming, that there’s so much more to explore. And so,

Ichibadass:
yeah, the gaming is just the medium, right? It’s for the, I guess the background entertainment, it’s like an artist working on a blank canvas, you know, whether they’re working with oil or acrylic or water painting, that is their, their medium, but the artist is the artist that has the vision that is trying to recreate something either from their own mind or, you know, something out in the world if they prefer realism, et cetera. So a lot of it’s weird how a lot of companies try to approach it without any form of gaming background. And they’re like, Oh yeah, we’re going to create this program and market it to gamers, you know, gaming for a change, you know, gamers for charity, which is perfectly fine there, it is not wrong, but it is also not optimal because to say, okay, I can take any gamer and they can fundraise the answer is yes. But the difference is taking somebody who is just, you know, just somebody who comes home after work and likes to hop on their Xbox and play video games and shoot the breeze with their homeboys is not going to fundraise as much as somebody who is more connected with their community, who has more experience in being more involved with the industry than just simply playing video games and not seeing anything and just staring blankly at the screen, right? Like you could, you could easily just take anybody that plays video games and be like, alright, here’s the fundraiser that you’re gonna fundraise for. Go forth and conquer. And the likelihood is they’re going to raise nothing, maybe a couple dollars, but the amount that they will fundraise is going to be relatively low. Now you could take somebody who’s a gaming influencer. Who’s never done charity either and give them, okay, here’s the organization you’re fundraising go forth and conquer. And they’ll actually, without even trying, they will generate some revenue to the charity. It won’t be as much as somebody who’s provided with the proper repertoire of tools and marketing tools and, you know, you know, background information to optimally, go about the campaign and create an event out of it and generate hype amongst their community, which either, or can benefit a regular, just anybody, you know, your casual gamer and influencer. If they’re given the proper tools and information, either one could actually do crazy good. So like even when streaming was starting to come up seven years ago, the promotion back then was, uh, hit live. Anybody can be the next top streamer. And it was specifically marketed towards gamers. And it’s like, that’s not true. You’re not just a gamer streaming to a platform. You are a content creator. You are an entertainer, you are an artist. You are, you know, ultimately you are, you who’s putting that content and stuff out there. Cause I’ve seen countless people who think like, Oh yeah, streaming’s easy. I’m just gonna play league of legends and yell at my teammates.

Alyssa:
I have, uh, someone very close in my life. He was like, yeah, it’s super easy. And also really wanted to get into East sports and had this very it’s super easy, but then would message me and be like, why isn’t this working? And then I’d give him some, some thoughts and feedback and he’d be like, I don’t want to do any of that. I’m like, well then your, then your dreams are not achievable if you’re not willing to adapt to the understanding of what it is you’re actually signing up for.

Ichibadass:
Yeah. I mean, can somebody get lucky? Which I don’t, I don’t like to use the word luck, because I believe in luck achieved through skill is if you’re in the right place at the right time. Okay. Then you can just like blow up something. You can just be incredibly fortunate that you’re, you know, you’re the first right. And you just get noticed either by esports organization, if you like doing, you know, playing any of the battle royals: Fortnite, Call of Duty, PUBG, Escape from Tarkov is not a battle Royale, but it is good example of like a competitive scene. Uh, same thing with like Overwatch, for example, is very heavy in esports. You could be somebody who’s just, you know, let’s say you’re streaming new content and you’re, you get to be on the top of the page and you just blow up and get super lucky. And you just started streaming like five minutes ago. That’s cool. Does it happen? Yes. Is it going to happen to everybody? Most definitely not. Um, that there’s a lot more.

Alyssa:
And even if it happens, you know, if you do manage to get that huge influx of viewers, there’s the sustaining aspect of it.

Ichibadass:
Yeah. Can you actually do anything with it for turnover? And the answer to that question is usually no, depending on their, uh, their experience.

Alyssa:
Yeah. And so you’ve, you’ve been creating content for a really long time. And one of the things that I find interesting is even, even as I dived into this space, like looking as a streamer, it just kind of looks like from the outside, looking in, it does look super easy, but do you mind sharing some of the things that you spend time on to get ready for your stream to make sure that when you go to do this live content creation, your prepared and ready?

Ichibadass:
Oh man. Well, that’s like getting hyped up for the stream, but like being ready that makes you more ready and more well-practiced is by actually just doing, because you could give somebody a literally anybody like, even anybody listening to this, you could give them the tools to get started and they can have all the information on the internet to like better optimize, optimize their stream or entertainment value, or you know, how to run their, their charity stream event. But it still doesn’t give them that hands on experience. It’s the same equivalent as taking somebody out of med school who has a lot of textbook knowledge, right. They know how to like make a tourniquet. They know how to, to clean and treat and bandage a wound or perform surgery, but they don’t have the same hands on experience as somebody who’s been a heart surgeon for 75 years.

Alyssa:
I mean, I’m not going to lie. I don’t know if I want the 75 year old heart surgeon operating on me, maybe, maybe in the room, but.

Ichibadass:
Wow. Uh, so yeah, it’s the same thing for, for streaming as, as prepared as you can be informational wise. Uh, it doesn’t beat the actual hands on experience, which before I even started streaming and a lot of things that I do in life included, I’d like to do a lot of research before I dive into anything. I’m just typically not very spur of the moment. So I had, uh, had been on Twitch for about nearly two months before I decided, yeah, I want to try streaming on my 2006 windows, XP laptop and dazzled DVC, 100 standard definition capture card and play console games. Like I had actually, when I first came to the platform in 2013, I did stream the first game I had ever streamed was, um, Dark Souls. Cause it’s actually what brought me to the Twitch in the first place.

Alyssa:
Oh really?

Ichibadass:
Oh yeah. I got stuck in Dark Souls. And back then, YouTube was not the place to look for content in terms of a walkthrough for Dark Souls, because everybody’s played through potentially it can be different because there’s different, uh, routing to Dark Souls. And so I was stuck and YouTube did not answer my question. So I was like, ah, okay, I’ve heard of Twitch. Let’s go, let’s go check it out. Which back then was also, it was Twitch and Justin TV is that is during that transition and just like most people nowadays, I mean, I know it’s substantially been changed up, but you search up the game that you want to watch in this case mean dark souls. And of course, you’re going to see the top casters, right? You’re going to see the person with 10,000 people watching them. You’re not going to scroll down the list and be like, yeah, I’m going to watch this guy who has zero.

Ichibadass:
And it’s a blank screen with some texts on it. So, you know, you go in the first couple of streams that you see on the top and the guy who was on the top of the directory for darks. And so at the time it was the Dark Souls speed runner. So not only did I get the answers to my question of how to get past the thing that I wanted, but I learned so many other tricks involved that made life so much easier. And then I was like, well, I can give this a shot. I can, I can start streaming. And so I’m not understanding the platform and the, the latency between the viewer and broadcaster at the time, because there’s like a 15 to 30 second delay. So somebody says, hi in chat back then, and you reply back as a streamer. Uh, there’s a good chance that they’re not there anymore because they feel like the streamers ignoring them. Right. They don’t get that instant gratification. You know, like an IRL, when you say hi to somebody, you accept, you expect some form of greeting or body language of them being like, yeah, who’s this loser, right, something. Back then, there was, if you were lucky, 15 seconds, upwards of really bad. And if your internet sacked 45 seconds latency between the viewer and the broadcaster, I didn’t know that. Um, but I talked to myself because I was used to, I I’m used to commentating my gameplay and some of the YouTube stuff that I had already done, but I didn’t like the viewer experience. Cause I watched my VODs, which I have clips saved from those, those streams back then. Cause I was doing achievements on dark souls as a part of like the streaming.

Alyssa:
Would you then take that content and put it on YouTube?

Ichibadass:
um, actually yes. Cause the idea was to create content for again, achievements in Dark Souls specifically. And that was just more straight to the point. Instead of watching these like hour long videos, I don’t, I like those videos back then. They did answer the question of like eventually, but you like YouTube is today now, right? It’s instant gratification. People want an answer now they want to see the cat video. Now! They, they don’t want to watch this hour and a half long video. Nobody’s got time for that unless they really love the content creator. Right? Like if you’re watching ASMR and you’re trying to fall asleep, all right, let’s go five hour video. Let’s do this. But for everybody else, who’s like in that moment and that’s, you know, what’s in their thought. They want it, now. So same thing with like those touching on like achievement stuff. I was like, okay, well I’m going to stream running through like specific areas that Dark Souls will knock it out achievements. But the quality of the viewer experience, because I, you know, VODs is like one of the best tools to have if you’re getting started, because then you can do your stream and unless you’re getting live feedback from a friend or, you know, a new member of the community, you look back on the VOD and you can like, okay, how was the audio quality? How was the video quality? How was your interaction or whatever likelihood if you’re just starting off, like there’s going to be literally no interaction, right? There’s going to be nobody in there. Especially if the directory is very saturated with like, you know, everybody and their mom is streaming Fortnite. Um, so the video quality and stuff was awful for, for, for streaming, with a dazzle bag. Then on a, on a seven year old laptop, it was not good. So like I tried streaming random things back then seven years ago and I was like, eh, I’ll wait until I build a basic PC and get a decent capture card, which I had the, uh, the El Gato game capture HD as my first HD capture card. Love, hate relationship right there

Alyssa:
So we talked about on-hands experience. The best thing you can do is to kind of just do it, but you’ve been doing it for a while. And so now, now I think we can officially say you’re an influencer.

Ichibadass:
Mmm. Okay.

Alyssa:
What types of things do you do? That’s not just the go live part as part of your whole brand, if you will.

Ichibadass:
Yeah. Like the background stuff or additional content

Alyssa:
All the additional work you put in that most people would not be able to see or maybe even discern. .

Ichibadass:
Yeah. So other things, other platforms, I guess I create content on, but also for like background stuff is background stuff would usually involve like, you know, reworking the panels, the emotes, which is a representation of people’s emotion used in chat for Twitch mixer, YouTube. I don’t know Facebook gaming uses them. I have no idea, um, are things that are, I guess, design aspects that I look at, but also changing up the overlay appearance of how my stream looks on screen and fun effects that actually can apply there without making the stream suffer. Like there’s some really awesome transitions and stuff that I’ve added to OBS and background stuff. Not only involves creating new things for that, but also like, I guess the education I’m always thirsty for knowledge when it comes to like, well, how can I improve the quality of the stream? How can I improve the encoding and eating video content from YouTube to like, you know, have inspiration, I guess, from other content creators, who’ve left their feedback to improve the audio, improve the video, uh, improve that onscreen presence of like overlays, et cetera. I also like to meme on my social media for Instagram and Twitter and very, very rarely I’ll upload something to TicToc. Cause I love the concept of skits. Skits are great. I love it so much.

Alyssa:
Short form is, is going to be the way that we’re going to go. Short form, going to be to me, to be a part of every influencer’s toolkit in the future. I believe whether it’s TicToc or something else that comes out. Um, like we like to laugh. We like to consume short pieces of content. We, that younger people have even shorter attention spans because they’ve got all these shiny lights and shiny things on the internet. So…

Ichibadass:
I think it also has to do with like content looking at YouTube is the best example. Example is we’ve been spoiled with instant gratification. So we kind of expect it from our content and that is not the fault of like any streamer or anything like that. But you look at mainstream media, you look at movies, TV shows, comedy, skits. What is it there for? It is there for entertainment to distract you, to take your mind off any garbage that has gone through your day. And you just want some cheap thrills, good laugh, maybe a jump scare, right. You’re looking for a specific kind of content. And that’s where like the short form content is fantastic is because then it highlights on your personality or the, the funny instances that happens on streams such as like clips on Twitch or like how the short content is for TicToc or once upon a time vine. Um, but I think that the mainstream problem there is like, you know, YouTube wanted to pull away from that from the little one minute, six, second videos uploaded to their platform that had like a billion views.

Alyssa:
Yeah. I think the minimum upload now is two minutes or something like that.

Ichibadass:
I think, I don’t know. Uh, I know they changed it because they made it really weird because you weren’t allowed to upload like long videos. If you weren’t a YouTube partnered, however, the hell they were to, it’s not verified. You get verified at a hundred thousand subscribers, but I think it’s partnered or something where you can get ad revenue off your YouTube content. Now, if you have X amount of watch time and whatever. So I think you can do the short videos. You can’t do long stuff. I can, I can do all of it. So I’m like uncertain as to like what specific changes were were made. Uh, because I grew with both my YouTube channel and Twitch channel at the same time. And then as there was like growing exponentially, I decided to focus on Twitch rather than YouTube, which I should have focused on both, but it’s so much work because so when you’re creating live content, which is more organic and natural creating, establishing that connection with your community, there is no editing involved. Sure. You can put on a facade and you are a character and be perceived a certain way. But when something happens, live on stream it’s live. Right. Whereas if something happens on a YouTube video, I, as the editor of my own content, have the opportunity to remove it, right? Like, let’s say my cat like decides to just jump out of nowhere and attack me and like cut off my arm or something. I can at least edit that out of the YouTube video. So it doesn’t get demonetized. Whereas if that happens on the stream, unless I press something to transition to a different scene, uh, yeah, that’s not so good.

Alyssa:
I mean, I don’t know, chat chat would probably love it.

Ichibadass:
Chat. Everybody would love it. That’s like modern day gladiators.

Alyssa:
Yeah. Chat chat is definitely this, this interesting thing. And I think it’s kind of amazing the different pockets of communities that are, are built on various platforms and the people who support another person, uh, all come together in some kind of way. And like, they become like a family of super fans where they’re like, we both like this same thing, so we’re going to like it together. Then it multiplies. I think it’s just so kind of fascinating. And you’ve streamed a few things that are not gaming related as well. Right.

Ichibadass:
Oh, let me think about this. I have streamed racketball, which I’ve been playing that sport for more than nine years. Uh, I have streamed painting my wall for charity and just because I needed a green screen at the time I have streams, I haven’t really streamed much IRL. I do love the concept of streaming in real life broadcast, a little bit of event stuff, kind of like PAX. Let me think. What else, what else is I have a stream outside of streaming I’ve streamed, restringing racquetball equipment. I’ve also streamed making art, like when I was doing the postcards and stuff, hand drawn postcards for people for, for my community. And then later I’ve done some for, for charity. Loved them, the postcards. Those are, those are really cool.

Alyssa:
Yeah. I, uh, I haven’t, I don’t actively stream now because I’m, you know, it’s, it’s not my main form of income or really even something I have a lot of time to do, but someone who I haven’t, hasn’t been in my channel in a long time that I haven’t talked to you messaged me on discord, a picture of the postcard. I sent them like three years ago.

Ichibadass:
Oh wow.

Alyssa:
And they were like, look what I just found. And so it was, it was a cool moment. Um, so people, people definitely love the personalized postcards.

Ichibadass:
Yeah. It’s definitely, it means a lot, especially when something’s actually being created specifically for them or any form of like, you know, I guess kindness that’d be appropriate to apply. I believe that I think I’m going above and beyond.

Alyssa:
People want to feel valued and validated. And often we go, I think, seeking it online because either we’re not sure how to communicate to the people in our lives in person or maybe we have, and nobody was listening. So we seek it out where we can find it. So I think it’s technology is, is agnostic good or bad. And I think it’s really cool that even though we, we see things on the internet that are great, that there’s lots of places where people find each other.

Ichibadass:
Yeah. It’s a way to connect and find other like-minded individuals.

Alyssa:
I think we could talk forever on that actually. But to kind of wrap up here, I went in to see if there is any additional thoughts maybe you wanted to share for any nonprofits that are listening and thinking about joining this space and looking at, people who create content on Twitch or Mixer or YouTube and thinking, you know, gamer versus influencer, if you had any parting thoughts.

Ichibadass:
I think the biggest point to make there is, has an organization hoping to put together a plat– uh, a program to take on whether it’s casual gamers, intermediate professional gamers, influencers, to educate themselves on the individuals that they want to collaborate with. Now I’m not going to say like work with, because yes, in a way, if you’re running a nonprofit, you’re looking at a business relationship, but you also want to establish a program that the individuals that you’re working with, these influencers, these gamers feel a part of, they feel moved to follow the banner in which you are carrying. That is why some of the, the current charity organizations in the gaming space do so well is when you mentioned them a lot, even, even casual gamers on the streaming platforms will be like, Oh yeah, I’ve heard of that charity thing. I don’t know a lot about it or how to fundraise for it. But yeah, I know it that like any new programs being introduced into this space can take advantage of the thought process of that. Anybody can raise money for charity. Anybody can start fundraising today. Although it wouldn’t be as optimized as somebody who’s seasoned fundraising charity, right. But with the right education and tools in place, it is true that, you know, any gamer can raise at least a dollar for the charity. And that’s, that’s still money that that organization didn’t have before right now, times that by the countless number of gamers in the world, you know, if, if what is it there’s more than 700 million gamers, uh, just playing, what is it if it wasn’t world of Warcraft,

Alyssa:
I know that PUBG is I think one of the biggest games in the world because it got picked up really huge in the Asian market. And for those of you listening, we’ll be doing an episode in the future to discern like, what’s it like working with an influencer that makes gaming content versus working with a game company or the gaming industry to really take advantage of the number of, of gamers there are.

Ichibadass:
But it’s like, if you took all the gamers, I was like, hey, just raise a dollar. Right. And there’s 700 million gamers that are interested in your organization and they all just raise a buck, that’s 700 million dollars right there, like,

Alyssa:
yeah. And in this regard, you know, it’s not even that they have to raise it themselves. Are you working with maybe a game developer that can help with something that’s willing to donate proceeds from, from something in game, but we’re going on a tangent there.

Ichibadass:
Yeah. So this is definitely covered a wide range of subjects and not just gamer or influencer or, uh, I guess more so not being just a gamer, like not just a gamer.

Alyssa:
Yeah. That’s, that’s going to be a new hashtag. I’m going to, I’m going to trend, not just a gamer.

Ichibadass:
That’s true. That’s true though. That’s just the gamer for charity. Yeah. Or any organization.

Alyssa:
Absolutely. I mean, marketing firms wouldn’t look at, at folks playing video games on platforms like Twitch, YouTube, or Mixer and offering them brand deals. If they thought that the only thing they were capable of is just playing a video game.

Ichibadass:
Cause it’s more than just gaming.

Alyssa:
Yeah. So thanks again, Ichi for joining us on the, on the show today. I see us as if there’s another person. I think that’s just an inclusive language I’ve adopted. Um, but thanks again for joining the, the show today and for the folks listening, if they wanted to check out your content and see what you’re about, where could they find you?

Ichibadass:
The best place to find me would be on Twitter, actually Twitter.com/IchibadassTV, Or they can check out my streaming platform that I play video games on and entertain my community at twitch.tv/ichibadass. Ichi, as in Japanese for number one, Ichi bad-ass and not itchy that you might require a cream for.

Alyssa:
And so if you’re interested in learning about speed running or, or joining the cast and the chat, I will say that having been a part of, um, each is community for a while now, uh, it’s chats, very welcoming, lots of memes, mostly wholesome, pretty great experience. And thanks so much for joining us today.

Ichibadass:
Yeah. Thank you so much for having me. I really appreciate it.

Outro
Alyssa:
Thanks for listening to this week’s episode and if you enjoy the show please consider sharing it with your friends and colleagues. You can find Influencer Fundraising the Podcast on Spotify, Overcast and many more. If you’d like to be a guest on the show or have an idea for an episode please head to www.influencerfundraising.com for more information. 

Thanks for listening and stay curious.